The need for electrician apprentices is great. As our country's infrastructure needs continue to grow, so does the need for electricians. If you're an electrical contractor, then that's great news ... if you can find qualified workers to meet your area's demand.
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A safe job site is a productive job site. Any injury on the job site not only eliminates the injured worker’s output, but it also affects other workers performance while they attend to the injured worker and the aftermath of the injury. Safety is not only an economical but also an emotional issue on any job site.
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The American workplace is a minefield of potential dangers, coming in all sizes and shapes – sparks, noise, chemicals, falling objects, sharp edges, just to name a few. The smart plan would be to encase workers in a protective bubble, but odds are that such an endeavor would severely hinder productivity. Still, procedures have to be instituted to safeguard employees and prevent workplace injuries, which can result in soaring workers’ compensation costs for employers.
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Normally when we think about our “safety leaders,” we think of people who have been selected to be the safety spokesperson to represent the company’s programs, policies, procedures, or goals. We then designate these people titles such as safety director, safety manager, or something similar that identifies them as the safety go-to person. In other instances, we expect other members of a company’s management team to be the safety leader, but usually safety becomes a side-bar to their normal duties.
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Protecting workers from the hazards of electric shock has been understood for decades. Recently though, more attention has been given to the role electrical equipment can play in minimizing arc flash hazards. The energy exposure of an arc flash incident can be significantly reduced when attention is given to the type of equipment specified and where it is installed in an electrical system.
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently announced a new rule that will better protect workers from the harmful effects of breathing respirable crystalline silica dust. Prevalent at certain workplaces, including construction sites and foundries, the dust can lead to lung cancer, silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and kidney disease.
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Every company cares about safety and health in the workplace and want their employees to remain healthy. In an effort to protect their employees, companies invest substantial time, effort, and money in trying to create safe and healthy work environments. They would do this without regard to government regulation. Managing compliance with federal and state Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements, however, is an indispensable part of managing safety in this day and age.
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On December 17, 2015, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), an agency of the Department of Labor (DOL), and the Department of Justice (DOJ) formally agreed to “double team” employers to investigate and prosecute worker endangerment violations. While they have worked together in the past, this is now a formal arrangement that employers should be very concerned about. While facing OSHA is bad enough, it’s a walk in the park compared to tangling with the DOJ.
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Say your boss, the owner, or CEO of the electrical firm you work for came to you with some exciting news. He offers you a 500,000 hour job to manage. Of course your boss was excited. The job he just handed over to you will bring in approximately $65 million over the next 4 years. You on the other hand, although excited, are shaking in your boots just thinking about it. In the past twenty or so years of working for this firm or the three firms before it, the largest job you ever managed was 200,000 hours, and you almost lost your shirt on that project. That job was well on its way to becoming one of those “killer jobs;” the kind that everyone in the industry talks about for years. Now you’re about to look down the throat of a beast that can either make you or sink the company you work so hard for, and take everyone down with it.
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Being a leader is a responsibility not everyone can take on. It takes flexibility, foresight, and true ability to work with others. For Klein Tools, we’ve remained an industry frontrunner for the past 159 years by supporting our customers, adapting to change, keeping a close eye on demand, and identifying our audiences’ needs. And similar to the electricians and tradesmen we make tools for, we get out what we put in – work ethic is still number one.
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