Chapter Corner

George Hedley

George Hedley works with contractors to build profitable growing companies. He is a professional construction business coach, popular speaker and best-selling author of "Get Your Construction Business to Always Make a Profit!" available at his online bookstore at www.hardhatpresentations.com. To sign-up for his free e-newsletter, be part of a BIZCOACH program or get a discount coupon for online classes at www.hardhatbizschool.com, e-mail gh@hardhatpresentations.com

Date Your Customers to Keep Them Loyal!

Remember when you were first dating? To get to know the other person, you spent lots of time talking, having fun, and doing things together. After the date, you would call and talk for hours, send them flowers, and keep in touch on a regular basis. Building relationships take commitment, time, and constant contact. When you don’t see each other or stay in touch, the relationship withers away and vanishes over time.

Build a Proactive Plan to Find Good Help!

I am tired of hearing contractors say they can’t find any good or trained help. When all they do is complain about their problems, they’ve decided to be negative and not develop positive solutions to their problems. I get calls and emails all the time from contractors asking how to find help. When people don’t apply, you can’t hire them. And when you don’t take out a help wanted ad, they won’t apply. And “yes,” it costs money and a proactive plan to recruit good people to work for your company!

Lead a 'Best in Class' Construction Biz

Stan is the owner of CompassContractors, specializing in electrical work on office building projects. They primarily work for general contractors as a subcontractor. Stan struggles finding enough time to get everything done and keeping multiple commitments to demanding customers. He finds himself juggling his time between working on bids, estimating, ordering materials, scheduling 25 field workers, making sure the right equipment is on job sites when needed, constant phone calls with foremen asking for advice, and daily job site visits to meet with his foremen and project superintendents. To make matters worse, customers demand he cut prices to win work, cash-flow is tight, his bookkeeper doesn’t get him job cost reports until months after projects are finished, he works over 65 hours per week, and he isn’t making much more money than he pays his top foreman.