The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) began enforcement of its crystalline silica standard as it applies to the construction industry on Saturday, September 23, 2017...
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The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee recently held a hearing to review the Trump administration’s replacement for general counsel for the National Labor Relations Board...
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IEC submitted comments to the Department of Labor (DOL) in late September in response to its request for information regarding a possible new overtime rule...
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Last week, the Committee on Education and the Workforce approved the Save Local Business Act (H.R. 3441) by a vote of 23 to 17...
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Central Ohio, IEC of Kentucky & So. Indiana, and Central Indiana IEC received grants through the IEC Foundation from the Home Depot Pro Xtra Grants...
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A professional will initially connect to your organization because it aligns with the industry where they are employed or do business. They will have a transaction when they find a product, program, service, or experience that presents a solution to their specific problem. They may even join – whether for a discount or from the recommendation of a colleague. Most often, associations want the stakeholders to take the next step – and belong.
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There are many things we can do with our time. Time is the single most valuable thing we have on this earth. As such, it is important that we spend our time wisely; and when we do, we must receive something of value in return. That return does not have to be monetary; it can simply be the satisfaction that we have done something to contribute to the success of the organization for which we volunteer. Whether we coach sports or other school activities for our children, volunteer at one of many nonprofit organizations, or support our local IEC chapter and IEC National, we become a part of something that is bigger than we are.
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Perhaps more than any other specialty contractor, electrical contractors bear the brunt of the "problem project.” Long after most other trades have completed their work and scattered in the wind, electrical contractors remain on site until the owner’s last inspection. And when the project is a “problem project,” the owner or prime contractor tend to liberally share their losses and liquidated damages among those specialty contractors remaining on site at the end. So what is an electrical contractor to do when the project starts coming off the rails?
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Construction jobsites are often unpredictable and impacted by daily changes. In order to reduce the impact of the daily changes, an electrician needs to see the work ahead of them. This is the power of a comprehensive Work Breakdown Structure (WBS). A WBS is a method to identify the necessary tasks that are needed to complete a specific job. The identification of tasks needs to be done by an electrician who is physically doing and leading the work (General Foreman or Foreman). To create a WBS, you bring the whole project team together to discuss and break down the project into small, manageable tasks. By writing down the individual tasks you will start to identify unanswered questions and potential risks. Once complete, the WBS can serve multiple functions. You can use it to accurately monitor job progress, real-world completion levels, and overall productivity to reduce the job risks and predict and prevent upcoming obstacles.
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Amidst ever-shrinking profits, increasing labor shortages, and decreasing productivity in the construction industry, companies are trying to solve new problems with old strategies. Industry profitability for most specialty contractors, including electrical companies, has consistently experienced 5-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) net income declines of 6.1 percent. A labor gap in the United States of 1.6 million workers, an aging workforce where more than half of its workers are over 45 years old, and a lack of interest for entrance from younger generations (43% said they would not enter construction irrespective of compensation) has increased costs and left companies unable to satisfy building demand.
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