Chapter Corner

Newsroom & Insights: Safety Corner

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Review Your Safety Plan

The beginning of a new year is a great time to refresh your focus on safety. Take this time to brush off your safety plan and get your head back in the game. Triggers are useful ways to initiate good practices. We use triggers for many safety related tasks; one good example is the replacement of batteries in smoke detectors when we change the clocks each year. As you take this opportunity to initiate a focus on safety, here is a list of items that you can use to stir discussion with your team on this topic.

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Developing an Effective SCCR Plan

One of the most fundamental calculations made on a power distribution system is that which yields available short-circuit current. Maximum available short-circuit current is an important parameter for every power distribution system as it provides a data point necessary to ensure equipment is being applied within its rating and the system is performing to meet expectations. Available short-circuit current is used in many other applications as well. The National Electrical Code demands this data point for enforcement of such Sections as 110.9 “Interrupting Rating,” 110.10 “Circuit Impedance, Short-Circuit Current Ratings, and other Characteristics,” and 10.24 “Available Fault Current.” Today we will discuss the development of an effective short-circuit current rating (SCCR) plan. Having a good plan in place can help increase electrical safety.

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HVAC: Not Just Your Average Load

The topic of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) presents a target-richenvironment with regard to the topic of safety. As installers, we may only be concerned with the tools, personal protective equipment, liquids and chemicals, and electrical hazards from a safety perspective. We have to also consider that HVAC equipment could play an important role throughout its life for the contents (including people and goods) of the structure or area it serves. The fact that HVAC systems account for 39 percent of the energy used in commercial buildings in the United States means that we probably see a lot of these types of applications.

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Short Circuit Current Ratings

Overcurrent protective device interrupting ratings (IR) and equipment short-circuit current ratings (SCCR) are key considerations for the safety of commercial and industrial electrical systems. Inadequate overcurrent protective device IR or equipment SCCR can create a serious safety hazard. The National Electrical Code (NEC®) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have requirements around these important ratings and have resulted in changes to equipment designs and specifications.

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After the Fire

If you haven’t been made aware of the fact that electrical equipment exposed to water can be extremely hazardous if re-energized without proper reconditioning or replacement, then you just may also be surprised to hear that a similar message is applicable to electrical equipment exposed to the smoke/soot that may result from burning materials during and after a structure fire. One could argue that a structure fire not only creates an environment that is hazardous to the health of the occupants and first responders, it also has the ability to create a hazardous location caustic to electrical equipment.

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Personal Protective Equipment

More than likely the old cliché of “Dress for Success” is a familiar phrase but one could argue that it takes on an entire new meaning when used in reference to an electrical worker. Appropriate dress can make a difference for electrical workers. Professionals working with electricity, including installers and inspectors, need to understand that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for the job is important if not critical to a better chance of a trip home and not to some other less desirable destination. It also just happens to be something OSHA finds very important. Personal protective equipment is not just something you buy and put on like other clothing, this equipment is life safety related and should be handled, treated, and understood as such.

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When Does it Make Sense to Outsource Payroll?

Payroll processing can be cumbersome for any industry…but nothing compares to the complexities of construction payroll.

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NEC and Worker Safety

The National Electrical Code® (NEC) is a document that seeks the practical safeguarding of persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. This document offers value to those who work on electrical systems. The NEC is an installation code that includes provisions from which the electrical contractors benefit. These provisions exist in the system for years after the structure is built and in operation.

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Hands on for Safety

We live and work in an electrical industry that can be dangerous at times. We all must continue to sharpen our skills through continuous education. This education does not come from a one-size-fits-all,off-the-shelf training program. There are many approaches to training and the best program is that which meets your needs and yields results. Results come in a safer work environment and dollars to the bottom line. Electrical safety is more than just applying a product or sitting through a training class; it’s a regiment of training and procedures implemented in combination with technology that saves lives. Working smarter, utilizing what you learn and the tools available on the job, is a good way to begin to work safer.

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Water vs. Electricity: Important Considerations for Safety

Water at the right place at the right time sustains life; water at the wrong place and the wrong time can become a nightmare. We need water to survive, but on the other hand, water can be quite dangerous and create unsafe conditions especially where electricity is involved. An important part of any design addresses and manages water. Builders work to ensure water does not intrude into the structure and their fight rages on many fronts; some are as obvious as dealing with rainwater through proper roof structures and a gutter system that removes the rainwater from the structure. Other less obvious fronts include preventing water intrusion from ground springs. Managing the elements of nature is important for safety as water intrusion can cause mold, rust, and other similar types of degradation that also may not be received well by electrical equipment. Mixing water and electrical equipment can have devastating results for safety. It’s worth a probe on this topic to get you and your team in the game and ensure safety is not compromised on your next project.

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